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Hello, I am working in this really small university and things would be so better if we had a 60 or 90 MHz. I was wondering if any of you would know any means by which we could acquire one. May be there would be some organization that is willing to donate a functional one because they are upgrading. or may be some other reason. If I want to find out if anyone is donating an NMR where should I go. Are there any other such venues? thank you

asked Jan 19 '11 at 14:06

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Pimezon
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updated Jan 19 '11 at 17:16

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Evgeny Fadeev
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I've changed title, to make it more informative. A good title really makes a difference when people read online posts. - Evgeny Fadeev (Jan 19 '11 at 17:17)


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Gifts of low end spectrometers occur fairly frequently. Usually these happen when a facility--in academia, or perhaps even more commonly in industry--replaces an older instrument with a newer one. It helps to have established some interaction with that other facility. If you have on-going NMR needs, nearby academic facilities will often be willing to help. So my recommendation is that you contact nearby NMR facilities to see if your current NMR needs can be met, and then be on the lookout for opportunities of gifts from those facilities when they are updating. Note also that there are opportunities for smaller institutions to acquire their own spectrometers, especially through NSF.

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answered Jan 20 '11 at 16:01

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Charlie Fry
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If you are interested in the 60 MHz range, well you could look at www.picospin.com, they have a nice portable 45MHz spectrometer. I think it costs about $20k. Their 1H spectra on the website look impressive.

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answered Jan 21 '11 at 12:51

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Damodaran Krishnan Achary
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Well, maybe someone responds here, but I will try to contact more people through mailing lists. Thanks.

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answered Jan 19 '11 at 17:07

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Evgeny Fadeev
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